Any other Brits worried about Brexit?


(Jon B) #1

Hi everyone. I don’t want to get political but are there any other UK passport holders that are worried how to continue or indeed start nomadic working with the Brexit uncertainty. I have done some precautions by becoming an Estonian e resident and opening an N26 account but i wonder if my dream of a nomadic lifestyle is now under threat.


(Philip Broughton-Mills) #2

Absolutely! Luckily I was able to get an Irish passport. If you have an Irish grandparent, I urge you to do the same, though it sounds like you would have already thought of that.


(PAP) #3

I also went down the route of getting an Irish passport, just in case!


(Jon B) #4

Unfortunately both my parents have passed away and i never met my grandparents so would love to find a way of seeing if there was any chance of an Irish passport. Other than that I’m trying to find if there are any eu countries i may be able to move to in order to try and get a passport. Any advice welcomed!


(Thomas K. Running) #5

While a citizenship is unlikely to happen anywhere before Brexit, I think the easiest yet effective measure you can make is to get residency in another EU (and ideally Schengen) country. While it’s pretty straight forward, you should hurry up!

Portugal could be a good choice for establishing a home base before Brexit, they are likely to let you stay indefinitely. It’s also an amazing country to spend time, plus they have a good tax scheme for 10 years.

They recently reduced the time required to get citizenship from 6 to 5 years. During those 5 years you should spend at least half the time in Portugal. But keep in mind that, Portugal being in Schengen, they don’t necessarily know exactly when you come and go to other Schengen countries.

No matter where you decide to move, try very hard to get registered as a resident there before Brexit happens, as it’s likely that you’ll get special treatment compared to someone who arrives after that date.


(Jon B) #6

Thank you, I love Portugal and have already spent time there previously but never applied for any paperwork as obviously I’ve never needed to.

Would welcome any assistance as to how to start the resudency process, without buying real estate there if possible due to time constraints.


(Jon B) #7

Sorry to bump but any assistance greatly appreciated with this.


(Jay Dax) #8

You should be able to track your genealogy back a few generations with online BDM (Birth, Marriage, Death) tools to rule in or out any EU passport possibilities.

I agree with the thread that Portugal is easiest and probably best choice right now but I’d advise sooner rather than later, take yourself off for a week and complete the formalities, all I needed was a PP they didn’t ask for proof off address though they probably should have.

You just need to work out which office you need to go to, it will be either the local town hall in small localities or Loja Lisboa in Lisbon. The form is very straightforward and the whole process takes 20 minutes, you are looking for a “REGISTRATION CERTIFICATE FOR CITIZENS OF THE EU/EEA/SWITZERLAND” if anybody tells you that you need to be resident for 3 months don’t believe them. No appointment is required but best get in early

Germany is also very unlikely to be asking any Brits to leave but they are a bit stronger on paperwork and you will need an address and a cooperative Wohnungsgeberbestätigung (landlord) to get your Anmeldung (place of residence, which is the gateway document that acts as a residence permit) and that could take some organising and incur costs, usually an advance appointment is required so it the timeline is lengthened.


(Jon B) #9

Thank you, looks like Portugal is the best option to keeping doors open to me - May I ask what is a PP? Proof of address may be an interesting one!


(Jay Dax) #10

Passport…

Anything with a street address should be fine, so an Airbnb rather than a hotel. When you have that address try and find out what Freguesia (Civil parish) it is in, you will need this information for the form and having it to hand makes it easier to convince the counter clerk that you actually live there :grinning:


(Thomas K. Running) #11

Since 2018 they don’t actually require proof of address anymore. You simply tell them your address.


(Jay Dax) #13

Nope, what you got was not a permanent residency it was a temporary residency EU/EEA certificate valid for 5 years. And you do not need to get a NIF first and it does not need to go onto the form.